Step 1- Idea

Assess the project idea

Ideas for projects can come from:

  • A perceived need from community or an emerging trend (i.e., creating a new skate park)
  • A perceived need to replace or revitalize an existing asset (i.e., updating an outdoor rink)
  • An accessibility requirement (i.e., adding a ramp or accessible picnic table to a playground)

It is important for the City to assess how new projects align with the Parks, Open Space and Leisure Master Plan, City Council Strategic Priorities and service level provisions, while ensuring there is no conflicting, or duplication of, existing City-led projects and initiatives.

Contact the Community Initiatives and Partnerships team at mycommunity@greatersudbury.ca. You will get an email within two business days, acknowledging that the City has received your email and project idea.

It takes a minimum of two weeks to assign a Leisure Services Community-led Projects Working Team to the project. The review and analysis of the project idea by the working team typically takes three to six months, depending on the type and scale of the idea, and looks at the following:

  • Is the project on City-owned land/property
  • Is the project aligned with the Parks, Open Space and Leisure Master Plan
  • Will the project impact current service level provisions
  • Will community consultation need to take place
  • Are there other stakeholders to be engaged
  • Identify potential risks/challenges

Additional time may be required if:

    • The idea needs to go to City Council for approval, be endorsed by a ward Councillor, and requires formal community consultation
    • The idea needs to be reviewed by pertinent managers to ensure it adds value to the ward and community, and is aligned with the Leisure Services Parks, Open Space and Leisure Master Plan priorities and emerging needs/trends in our community
    • The idea has impacts on, and needs to be reviewed by, other divisions and departments outside of Leisure Services
    • The idea is a first of its kind in the city and external research is required
    • City staff need to visit the site of the proposed project

Following the initial review, a recommendation for approval is made, or the project idea is declined. That decision is communicated back to the community group.

All projects require written approval and support from the City before any fundraising and planning begins.